Gavin Erickson

Gavin Erickson

Monday, 17 December 2018 11:47

Privacy and cookies policy

The British Acupuncture Accreditation Board (BAAB) is committed to good governance and transparency. This policy sets out what we do with your information when we collect it, why we collect it and how we dispose of it. This policy is in accordance with the Data Protection Act 2018.

Our Data protection Registration number is ZA381632

Your Rights

If we have collected any of your personal data, then you have a number of rights. These are:

  • To have confirmation of what data we hold on you and what we do with that data
  • To have a copy of the data we hold provided to you free of charge
  • The right to correct the information we hold on you if it is factually incorrect
  • The right to object to us using your information
  • Under certain circumstances you have the right to have your data erased and to tell BAC to cease further dissemination of your data to third parties
  • You also have the right for your data to be transferred to another organisation in an electronic format

You are entitled to request a copy of the personal data we hold about you and you have the right under the General Data Protection Regulation and Data Protection Act 2018 to control how we use your data, by asking us to delete it or limit how we use it.

The Data we hold and what we do with the data

EMPLOYEES

What data do we collect?     

We collect the data we need to verify who you say you are, to confirm the qualifications you have on your CV are correct and collect all the information we require to register you for payroll, taxation and pension arrangements and to pay you your salary. We will also keep records of your contractual arrangements and any other employment documents that we are required to keep or need for us to comply with employment legislation

Do we share your data with anyone outside of BAAB?

We outsource our payroll to a third party. They will have access to your name, National Insurance Number, your tax code and salary and pension arrangements. They need this to pay you and to make sure your tax and pension payments are made correctly. We also share your name and bank account details with our bank, so they can transfer money to your bank account. Finally, we share your name and other basic information with NEST, our pension provider, so they can set up your pension account and contact you

What is the legal basis for keeping my data?

We keep your data to comply with employment legislation and to make sure that we can pay you

What would happen if I refused to give you this data?

In this case we would not be able to comply with employment legislation or pay you. This means we would not be able to employ you.

Who has access to my records?

Once you have been employed, only the lead accreditation officer and Chair of the Board will have full access to your records.

How long will my records be kept for once I leave BAAB?

6 years

SITE VISITORS

What data do we collect?     

We collect the data we need to verify who you say you are, to confirm the qualifications you have on your CV are correct and collect all the information we require to register you for payment.

Do we share your data with anyone outside of BAAB?

We share your name and brief biography with the course providers you will be inspecting and with our bank so they can transfer money to your bank.

What is the legal basis for keeping my data?

We keep your data to comply with contractual needs and to make sure that we can pay you

What would happen if I refused to give you this data?

In this case we would not be able to use your services

Who has access to my records?

Only BAAB employees have access to your records.

How long will my records be kept for once I leave BAAB?

1 year

DIRECTORS AND COMMITTEE MEMBERS

What data do we collect?     

We collect your name, title and your CV. In the case of Directors, any other information required by Companies House. Your CV is considered when committee members consider your appointment to a committee.

Do we share your data with anyone outside of BAAB?      

Director’s information is shared with Companies House and in some cases, listed as a signatory with the BAAB bank. We share with your permission your name, picture and brief biography on our website.

What is the legal basis for keeping my data?

To comply with company law and to contact you for the purposes of committee meetings and to keep you informed of developments that are relevant to your membership of a committee.

What would happen if I refused to give you this data?

In this case we would not be able to use your services.

Who has access to my records?      

Basic information on Director’s is publicly available from Companies House, otherwise contact information is restricted to those BAAB staff who will need to contact you for the purposes of meetings or other agreed activities.

How long will my records be kept for once I leave BAAB?

1 year

COURSE PROVIDERS

What data do we collect?

We collect information on staff, senior managers and owners of the organisation.

Do we share your data with anyone outside of BAAB?      

No. The information is used within BAAB to ensure that accreditation requirements are met and maintained and for our records. We also send the information to the Site visitors who will be reviewing your organisation. Once your organisation is accredited or reviewed we list the Principal or Director of the organisation at the time of inspection on the review report.

What is the legal basis for keeping my data?

To comply with BAAB accreditation requirements

What would happen if I refused to give you this data?

In this case we would not be able to accredit your organisation

Who has access to my records?

BAAB staff and the site visitors reviewing your organisation

How long will my records be kept for once I am no longer involved in an accredited course?   

Any CV’s will be destroyed 6 months after you leave . Other information, such as student and staff names will be destroyed when the inspection is completed.

ENQUIRIES

What data do we collect?     

We collect your name, email address and if applicable your organisation details

Do we share your data with anyone outside of BAAB?

No

What would happen if I refused to give you this data?

We will not be able to contact you to discuss your enquiry

Who has access to my records?

BAAB staff who have the responsibility of following up on your enquiry

How long will my records be kept for once I withdraw my consent regarding accrediting my course?

We will contact you three times to follow up on any accreditation enquiries you have made but will remove your details from our enquiries list after six months

OUR GENERAL DETAILS

The data controller for this personal data is the British Acupuncture Accreditation Board. The Data Protection Officer is Petra Nannes. You can contact the Data Protection Office by email on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR USE OF THIS WEBSITE

This website may automatically collect anonymous information about your visits, such as your Internet service provider, your browser, how long you stay on the site and what pages you visit. None of this information can be linked to you and is used by us to monitor general use of the website and help improve the website by identifying which sections are most and least used.

For instance, if we know which sections are most often used and which are visited less often and for less time, we can make changes that will enable the website to better meet the needs of our diverse range of visitors.

For more information about how this information is collected using cookies and how you can restrict or block cookies, see our Cookies page

OTHER WEBSITES

If you transfer to another website from a link within the BAAB website, this privacy policy does not apply. We recommend you examine all privacy statements for all third party websites to understand their privacy procedures

Cookies page

To give you the best possible experience, this site uses cookies. Using baab.co.uk means you agree to our use of cookies.

Information about our cookies

What are cookies?

A cookie is a small amount of data sent to your computer or mobile phone from a website. This means the website can recognise your device (your computer or mobile phone) if you return to the same site. A cookie often includes a unique identifier, which is a randomly generated number. This is stored on your device's hard drive. Many cookies are automatically deleted after you finish using a website. Cookies are not programs and do not collect information from your device.

Cookies may come with or without an expiry date. Cookies without an expiry date exist until the browser is closed, while cookies with an expiry date may be stored by the device until the expiry date passes.

How we use cookies

We use cookies on this website to make your experience of using it faster and easier. We also use cookies (from Google Analytics) to find out how you use the website. These collect anonymous information about your visits, such as your internet provider, your browser, how long you stay on the site and what pages you visit. None of this information can be linked to you and is used by us only to help improve the website. For instance, if we know which sections are most often used and which are visited less often and for less time, we can make changes that will enable the website to better meet the needs of our diverse range of visitors.

You can restrict or block cookies set by this website but this may affect your experience on the website; parts of the site may not work or may not work properly.

How to manage your cookies

Cookies are sent to your browser (whether you use Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Safari or any other browser) by a website and then stored in the cookies directory of your device.

To check and update your cookies settings, you will need to know what browser you are using and what version of it you have. You can usually find this out by opening the browser (just as if you were going to use the internet) and then clicking on 'Help' and then 'About'. This will give you information about the browser version you are using.

To find out how to allow, block, delete and manage the cookies on all standard web browsers, go to www.aboutcookies.org and select the browser and version you are using. You'll also find information about how to delete cookies from your computer. If you use a mobile phone to browse the website or other sites that use cookies, please refer to your handset manual for guidance.

For further information about cookies see www.allaboutcookies.org.

Monday, 17 December 2018 11:37

BAAB terms and conditions

This website is owned and operated by British Acupuncture Accreditation Board (BAAB). By using this website you are agreeing to accept the following terms and conditions. As these terms and conditions may be updated from time to time, you should check regularly to make sure you are aware of the up-to-date current version.

Disclaimer

The BAAB denies all liability to the fullest extent permitted by law for any loss or damage resulting (either directly or indirectly) from access to and/or use of this web site, or the use of information and materials contained on it or any associated or linked web site.

Accuracy

Although we have taken all reasonable steps to provide you with access to adequate and reputable content, we make no warranties or representations as to its accuracy or the accuracy of any information contained in associated or linked sites.

Links

The BAAB is not responsible for the content or reliability of external websites. Links should not be taken as an endorsement, guarantee, warranty or representation by the BAAB of the quality or accuracy of the information, products or services provided to you. We cannot guarantee that these links will work at all times and we have no control over the availability of linked pages. Please be aware that the BAAB s not responsible for the privacy practices of other websites.

Cookies

What is a cookies?

A cookie is a small amount of data sent to your computer or mobile phone from a website. This means the website can recognise your device (your computer or mobile phone) if you return to the same site. A cookie often includes a unique identifier, which is a randomly generated number. This is stored on your device's hard drive. Many cookies are automatically deleted after you finish using a website. Cookies are not programs and do not collect information from your device.

Cookies may come with or without an expiry date. Cookies without an expiry date exist until the browser is closed, while cookies with an expiry date may be stored by the device until the expiry date passes.

How we use cookies

We use cookies on this website to make your experience of using it faster and easier. We also use cookies (from Google Analytics) to find out how you use the website. These collect anonymous information about your visits, such as your internet provider, your browser, how long you stay on the site and what pages you visit. None of this information can be linked to you and is used by us only to help improve the website. For instance, if we know which sections are most often used and which are visited less often and for less time, we can make changes that will enable the website to better meet the needs of our diverse range of visitors.

You can restrict or block cookies set by this website but this may affect your experience on the website; parts of the site may not work or may not work properly.

How to manage your cookies

Cookies are sent to your browser (whether you use Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Safari or any other browser) by a website and then stored in the cookies directory of your device.

To check and update your cookies settings, you will need to know what browser you are using and what version of it you have. You can usually find this out by opening the browser (just as if you were going to use the internet) and then clicking on 'Help' and then 'About'. This will give you information about the browser version you are using.

To find out how to allow, block, delete and manage the cookies on all standard web browsers, go to www.aboutcookies.org and select the browser and version you are using. You'll also find information about how to delete cookies from your computer. If you use a mobile phone to browse the website or other sites that use cookies, please refer to your handset manual for guidance.

For further information about cookies see www.allaboutcookies.org.

Copyright

Different copyright restrictions apply to individual documents on this website. The BAAB has tried to acknowledge the copyright of others where necessary. Unless otherwise stated, or the context otherwise makes clear, the following copyright statement applies to the documents found on this website.

"Individual personal users are granted permission to access BAAB copyright material, which may be reproduced free of charge in any format or medium, provided it is reproduced accurately and not used in a misleading context. Where any of the material on this site is being republished or copied to others, the material must be identified and the copyright status acknowledged. The permission to reproduce BAAB copyright protected material does not extend to any material on this site that is identified as being the copyright of a third party. Authorisation to reproduce such material must be obtained from the copyright holders concerned." 

The BAAB logo is a registered trademark and may not be used without the prior written permission of the BAAB.

Information about you

There are times when you may provide us with information about yourself, such as your name, address or email address:

  • if you send us a query by email, or provide feedback via the website, we will be aware of your email address and your name, if you include it
  • if you use the enquiry form on the Contact page, we ask you to give your name and email address
  • if you ask for an electronic document or publication, we will need your name and email address and
  • if you request a printed document or publication we will need your name and postal address.

We will use this information primarily to enable us to respond to your request or feedback; we may also retain the information and your query or feedback to help us monitor use of the website in order to ensure that we are providing the best service we can.

If you do not wish us to retain your name, address or email address after we have responded to you, you should tell us so when you contact us.

We will not make any personal information available to a third party (another organisation or person outside the BAAB), unless required to do so by law, but we may use anonymous information about your enquiry or feedback in monitoring or reporting on the use of the website.

We will take reasonable precautions to ensure the security of your personal information; however, we cannot guarantee the safety of information sent over the Internet.

Information about your use of this website

This website may automatically collect anonymous information about your visits, such as your internet provider, your browser, how long you stay on the site and what pages you visit. None of this information can be linked to you and is used by us only to help improve the website. For instance, if we know which sections are most often used and which are visited less often and for less time, we can make changes that will enable the website to better meet the needs of our diverse range of visitors.

Virus protection

The BAAB makes every effort to check and test material for viruses. However, it is recommended that you run an anti-virus program on all material downloaded from the Internet. The BAAB does not accept any responsibility for any loss, disruption or damage to your data or your computer system that may occur whilst using material derived from this website.

Other websites

This website links to other websites and you should be aware that the privacy policies of other websites may be different to, and are not the responsibility of, the BAAB

Applicable law

These terms and conditions shall be governed by English law.

Thursday, 01 June 2017 15:08

Online Learning Matrix (OLM)


Legacy document from jiscinfonet.ac.uk

Tuesday, 11 November 2014 00:00

New programme proposal pro-forma

Tuesday, 11 November 2014 00:00

Key benefits of BAcC membership

  • 'Gold standard' professional insurance: for medical malpractice and public products liability cover of up to £5 million
  • Additional insurance benefits: 24-hour legal helpline; professional legal protection up to £100,000; cover for additional therapies; cover for teaching; personal accident insurance up to £25,000
  • Register of members: published annually and listing all all UK and overseas practising members' practice details.
  • BAcC website practitioner search listing: now the most popular way for the public to find BAcC members and book appointments

Many people decide to study acupuncture because they have experienced the benefits of acupuncture treatment and are fascinated by this very different system of medicine. Sometimes people are looking for a new career and want to retrain in a profession that has values that are important to them.  A career in acupuncture is both rewarding and challenging. Make sure you have the very best start by choosing a course accredited by the BAAB.


What courses are available?

There are more than 10 BAAB-accredited courses around the UK, each with their own unique style and resources to give you a professional education in acupuncture. You’ll find a brief description of them here with links through to their websites.


How do I choose the best course for me?

We monitor and support all our courses to ensure they continue to provide excellent standards across a range of criteria from teaching and learning to student representation, library facilities to clinical training, so you’ll find these benefits in all our courses. Your choice may be to do with a convenient location for you, or because of the particular style of a course. You may prefer a dedicated private college or a University environment. Most courses hold Open Days, so you can go and see for yourself and talk to teachers, students and patients about what to expect. Links to all our courses are here.  Click here to hear Annie’s advice about choosing the best course for you.

Do I have to have previous experience in healthcare?

No, our courses give you all the education you need to become an acupuncturist who is knowledgable, competent and safe. From anatomy all the way through to setting up your practice, you’ll graduate with all the skills and experience to become a professional practitioner.

How long does it take to qualify?

Full time study takes three years. Courses are often available at weekends or in the week to suit your circumstances and can also be done on a part-time basis, over a longer peri-od. If you have relevant previous experience or training, APEL schemes  may offer you exemption from parts of the training.


How much will it cost?

Fees vary between institutions and start from about £5000 a year for a full time pro-gramme, usually payable in instalments. Most courses are eligible for either Career Devel-opment or Student Loans which can help you with your fees. Click on the links to our courses for their fees and what financial support they can offer.


What qualification will I get?

All our courses meet honours degree level standards, and depending on the course you choose you may achieve a Licentiate, a Diploma, a BSc or an MSc qualification.


What is involved in studying acupuncture?

We aim to produce practitioners who are reflective, research-minded, knowledgable, competent  and safe. This involves a broad and deep education which will include:

Chinese medicine
history, culture, medical theory, diagnostic skills, differential diagnosis

Conventional medical sciences
anatomy, physiology, pathology, medical terminology, red flags, pharmacology

Clinical skills
point location, moxibustion, tongue and pulse diagnosis, cupping, electro-acupuncture, palpation

Clinical Practice
a minimum of 400hrs of working with patients in a clinical setting, of which you’ll spend 200 hours taking increasing responsibility for patient care.

Research
research methodology, critical reading, using research to identify best practice

Reflective practice
reflecting on action to engage in a process of continuous learning, bringing theory and practice together

Patient-practitioner skills
communications, empathy, listening

Business skills
accounting, advertising and promotion, business planning, setting up a practice

To find out more about studying and practicing acupuncture, watch our videos of professional acupuncturists  talking about their courses and what they love about their work.

Will I be able to practice straight away?

Yes, on graduation from a BAAB accredited course, you’ll be eligible to join the BAcC  and either join a practice or set up your own. The BAcC can give you a lot of support in setting up your practice as well as the help you’ll get on your course.

Are there jobs for acupuncturists?

Most acupuncturists are self-employed, and have to put effort into establishing a practice. It can take a few years to get your practice going, because one of the best ways to attract new patients is by recommendation from existing patients. Some integrated or comple-mentary practices employ acupuncturists and occasionally there are opportunities in the NHS.

What will I earn?

As a self-employed acupuncturist, your income is dependant on how busy you are. In pri-vate practice, most acupuncturists charge between £30 an £60 per session depending on their location. For most people, 20-30 patients a week provides a reasonable income, but its important to remember you have to pay rent, expenses and tax out of your earnings. Some acupuncturists are busier than that and some less so.


What’s it like to be an acupuncturist?

Listen to some of our members talking about what they like about their work as acupuncturists and the inspiring post graduation activities they are involved with. The National Careers Service also has information about acupuncture as a career.


Can I join the BAcC as a student?

Yes, student affiliate status with the BAcC is free. This enables you to be involved with the profession from the start of your training, benefit from website information, debate and links, contribute to the development of BAcC services for students and enjoy the annual conference.

Sunday, 09 November 2014 00:00

Acupuncture as a career

Acupuncture is a fascinating, challenging and rewarding career, attracting people from many diverse backgrounds - see below to watch videos of professional acupuncturists talking about why they chose acupuncture as a career, what they like about their work, and offer their advice about choosing the right course.

Working as an acupuncturist

An acupuncturist is a healthcare professional who takes a holistic approach to the maintenance of health and the management of disease, with a focus on improving overall wellbeing. Working as an acupuncturist, you can expect to work with a wide range of people from many different backgrounds. Common conditions treated by acupuncture are headaches and migraine, arthritis, back pain, digestive problems, sports injuries, infertility, menopausal and menstrual issues, anxiety, stress-related problems and many more.

Typically, you would begin with a consultation to obtain your patient's history and current health issues. Every patient is treated as an individual, and you will reframe the information they give you, to work out their diagnosis, point prescription and treatment plan. You’ll discuss their current treatment regime and what they might gain from acupuncture. As an acupuncturist, your treatment involves the insertion of needles into a selection of the hundreds of acupuncture points located across the body. You may also use massage, moxibustion (heat) or other techniques to support your work. Treatment is rarely painful or even uncomfortable – in fact, patients often report feeling very relaxed and sleepy during treatment.

Chinese medical theory, of which acupuncture is a part, takes a unique holistic view of health and disease. This perspective is a fascinating way to understand and treat people’s  physical and emotional problems. Everyone you see is different, and brings their own unique story to you to unravel, in order to help them to a better state of health. Being an acupuncturist is rarely boring, and the work can be very gratifying.

Most acupuncturists are self-employed and work from complementary health clinics, multi bed clinics, GP or other surgeries and from home. being self-employed means you can choose your place of work and what hours you work.

British Acupuncture Council (BAcC) acupuncturists engage in continuing professional development (CPD) to keep their knowledge and skills fresh, and to keep in touch with de-velopments in research and with the acupuncture community.

Acupuncture is growing in popularity and is increasingly recognised as safe, efficacious and cost effective in treating many acute and chronic ailments. Training at a reputable college or university on an accredited course will enable you to gain the skills you need to work successfully as an acupuncturist. For those who have a passion for healing without drug-based treatments and want a hands-on career helping to treat the pain and challenges of many different health conditions, a career in acupuncture may be the best choice.

Karen

Karen was a journalist and editor and has been an acupuncturist for just 12 months. She explains what her course involved, her exciting research and how studying acupuncture changed her life.

Annie

Annie has been an acupuncturist for 16 years and talks about how she enjoys listening to patients’ stories, and reframing the information they give her to empower them to move back to a state of health. She gives valuable advice about choosing the right course for you.

Tiziana

Tiziana graduated in Australia 8 years ago and talks about her passion for acupuncture, why its important to join the BAcC, how to be successful in practice and why she has the best job in the world.

Mike

Mike was a medical social worker and has been in practice as an acupuncturist for 15 years. He talks about his inspiring charitable work with patients in the Gaza strip and how studying acupuncture is an empowering experience.

Caitlin

Caitlin is still loving being an acupuncturist after 11 years in practice. In her previous work as a drugs and alcohol counsellor, she saw the benefits of acupuncture for life offenders in prison. She appreciates her lifestyle as an acupuncturist and talks about her continuing professional development and why she says ‘just do it!’.

Sunday, 09 November 2014 00:00

Studying acupuncture

Acupuncture is a fascinating subject and BAAB accredited courses ensure that you have a professional training covering everything you need to succeed.

The training itself requires a considerable commitment on your part. This is not only in time and effort, but in a willingness to embrace a very different way of looking at health and disease, and being open and willing to be challenged yourself and to grow through self-reflection.

Many professional acupuncturists value their career because of this different way of seeing  health and disease, and the rich experience they have of helping their patients through acupuncture.

BAAB accredited courses offer a thorough grounding in Chinese medicine theory together with physiology, anatomy and other western medical sciences, in order to provide an integrated understanding of both traditional eastern and modern western approaches to healthcare. You will spend a minimum of 400 hours in a clinical setting working with patients, and at least 200 hours being responsible for the personal management of patients through all aspects of the treatment encounter. You’ll also learn how to set up and run your practice, to give you the best opportunity to succeed  in becoming a professional acupuncturist.

Graduates of BAAB accredited courses are automatically eligible to join the British Acupuncture Council (BAcC), the UK's lead governing body for acupuncture. The BAcC offers many benefits for their members.

shutterstock 45537523Acupuncture is a rewarding career choice for many people in the United Kingdom and worldwide. Working for yourself means you can choose your own hours and style of practice, and helping people to achieve a better state of health can be very gratifying. Click here to watch a range of acupuncturists from different backgrounds talk about how they feel about their career choice.

Sunday, 09 November 2014 00:00

Accredit your course

BAAB accredited courses guarantee excellence in training, safe practice and professional conduct.

Advantages of Accreditation

  • the opportunity to offer your students a professional education and training in acupuncture equivalent to the majority of degree level healthcare courses
  • support and advice to develop your course
  • national recognition of your course as providing high standards of education and training
  • once fully accredited, your graduates are automatically eligible for British Acupuncture Council (BAcC) membership with excellent benefits
  • joining a professional community of acupuncture educators

Development of a new programme

If you are considering developing an acupuncture programme for accreditation by the Board you should look at the details on the website and then get in touch with us. The Board’s lead accreditation officer will answer any queries and ensure you understand the standards expected, the resources required to run a programme, the process through which you would be going and the costs involved.

If you decide to pursue accreditation you will be allocated an accreditation officer (AO) for advice and support and with whom you will arrange any visits. See the 'Downloads' tab for the relevant documents, including a New Programme Proposal (NPP) pro-forma for completion. The NPP comprises an outline of your organisation, an outline of the planned programme, the resources you already have in place and those you plan to have and the timescale for these, and the issues that you need to address. It also requires your contact details and a statement of commitment to the principles, standards and expectations of the Board which should be signed by the appropriate senior person in your organisation. The NPP should be discussed at draft stage with your accreditation officer (AO).

The proposal will be circulated by the Board office and considered at the next meeting of the Accreditation Committee (AC) against the following criteria:

  • The institutional representative has had a thorough discussion with the lead AO and subsequent contact with the allocated AO.
  • The NPP demonstrates that you have given serious thought to the planned development, that you are developing the programme to meet the requirements of SETAPs and are aware of some of the issues you will need to address.
  • The relevant senior person in your organisation has confirmed in writing on the NPP that they are committed to developing the institutional context and the programme with a staff team, to meet the Board’s requirements and to comply with the Board’s processes including fee payment.


If the AC considers that the above criteria have been met, the NPP will be forwarded to the Board with their recommendation. You may receive feedback and be asked to resubmit, after which the Board will consider the NPP together with the AC’s recommendation. Acceptance of an institution’s NPP is an endorsement of the institution’s potential for developing towards accreditation, but is not a guarantee that accreditation will be successfully achieved. Your course will be included on all circulation lists for receipt of BAAB and BAcC policy documents and will be included on the Board’s website under ‘Institutions with New Programme Proposal’. You may advertise the fact that you are ‘in a formal relationship with the Board, the programme is being developed to meet the requirements of the Board and is subject to accreditation by the Board'. Where a programme is already running, graduates of that programme are not eligible for direct entry to BAcC membership, but may apply for membership individually, until the institution and its programme has achieved full accreditation.

From the point of acceptance of their New Programme Proposal, the Board (in an advisory capacity) will support the institution in their development of the course, the resources and infrastructure. From this point also the institutions will be required to pay the Board's annual fee which is inclusive of all Board planned visits – details are available from the BAAB office.

Approved for Development to Full BAAB Accreditation

Within a year or two of the New Programme Proposal being accepted, you will need to submit full details of the proposed programme, the policies on which it is based, the way it is to be managed and the resources that will be made available. Your AO will be available to offer advice and support throughout this process. The criteria for awarding provisional accreditation are:

  • the programme planning demonstrates that it is likely substantially to meet the Standards of Education and Training for Acupuncture (SETAPs)
  • there is one appropriately qualified and experienced acupuncture teacher either in post or appointed two months prior to the planned start of the programme and firm planning for a second to be appointed within six months of the programme commencing (a total of no less than 1.0 WTE (whole time equivalent) between the two posts)
  • firm plans are in place for a teaching clinic to open within six months of the commencement of the programme
  • firm arrangements have been made for the first cohort to observe clinical practice during their first year.

Your documents will be scrutinised by the Accreditation Committee, and a visit arranged to discuss their feedback with the course team, and with students if the course has already commenced. A report of this visit is discussed by the Accreditation Committee and forwarded with a recommendation to the Board, which has the final say on whether Approval for Development to Full BAAB Accreditation is awarded. Approval for Development to Full BAAB Accreditation may be awarded either to a course that has already commenced or to a course that is planned to commence shortly.

Full Accreditation

The timing of submission of documents for full accreditation is based on the need for the institution to demonstrate that the programme substantially meets the SETAPs. Institutions that have been awarded provisional accreditation will normally submit for full accreditation:

  • once their first cohort on the approved for full BAAB accredited programme has completed two years of the programme
  • there is external examiner’s feedback on the standard of at least their first-year work
  • the teaching clinic has been fully operational for at least a year
  • the first cohort of students has commenced their ‘management of patients’ clinical experience at least two months prior to the accreditation visit.


Full Accreditation ensures that the standards achieved by the graduates are appropriate for independent primary health care professional practice. The visit will normally extend over four days and will include observation of classroom teaching, observation of clinical teaching and supervision, and will include external verification of compliance in the clinic with the BAcC's Code of Safe Practice. Graduates of courses which have achieved Full Accreditation are eligible for direct entry to BAcC membership.

From this point institutions can claim that they are fully accredited so long as they continue to demonstrate that they are meeting the requirements of the Board. This is achieved through annual reports, annual visits by the Accreditation Officers and intermittent renewed accreditation visits by a team. The period which can elapse before renewed accreditation will be specified at the time of full accreditation and will depend on the robustness of the course management and the overall quality of the course provision, and may be up to 6 years.


Full details of the processes of accreditation are available in the Accreditation Handbook

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